Superheroes capes cowls and the creation of comic book culture

5.37  ·  2,492 ratings  ·  989 reviews
Posted on by
superheroes capes cowls and the creation of comic book culture

SUPERHEROES! by Laurence Maslon , Michael Kantor | Kirkus Reviews

This is a book about the history of super-heroes in the media. The super-hero is now a mainstay of popular culture on television and the silver screen but some of us older folk recall a time when they were only available on paper. Low paid men with typewriters did the scripts and other chaps with actual pencils drew the characters on paper. Often they did not tell their friends what they did in case they might be spat on. Now top directors vie for the latest super-film. My, how things have changed!
File Name: superheroes capes cowls and the creation of comic book culture.zip
Size: 62948 Kb
Published 23.12.2018

Why MARVEL Superheroes Live in NEW YORK CITY! -- Comic Misconceptions -- NerdSync

Superheroes!: Capes, Cowls, and the Creation of Comic Book Culture [Laurence Maslon, Michael Kantor] on christmas-poem.info *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Superheroes!: capes, cowls, and the creation of comic book culture

Capes, Cowls, and the Creation of Comic Book Culture by Laurence Maslon is well researched, well presented and nearly comprehensive, at least as much as it can with a community of followers myself included who grew up with and who can still appreciate the masked men and women of the multiverse. I particularly appreciated that author Maslon is upfront at the outset that everyone who knows this topic will find one of his or her favorite characters missing I did: Ka-Zar. It is inevitable in a topic this vast. Most obviously — and least understandable — is the total lack of discussion of Manga. Maslon does offers a bone of sorts to those characters that do not really fit the overall narrative with short features throughout the text devoted to Heroes and Villains We Love. In fact one of these offered a review of one of the most puzzling of characters from my own giant box of comics — Hawk and Dove! I mean really, even as a kid I knew that Dove was virtually useless as a hero, his brother Hal could and would at least punch someone, Dove just quivered in angst — not exactly the power a reader wants in his or her fantasy hero.

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date. For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now. Javascript is not enabled in your browser. Enabling JavaScript in your browser will allow you to experience all the features of our site. Learn how to enable JavaScript on your browser.

Enjoy scifi? Please spread the word :)

Collectors divide the history of comic books into discrete eras evocative of Olympic medals: golden age, silver, bronze. That show, which starred Adam West and Burt Ward as a pair of civic-minded squares tirelessly do-gooding against a Pop Art, go-go-booted backdrop, elicits three very different responses across the life course of a young nerdling. As children, we love the show unreservedly — the bold colors! The fight scenes! The derring-do! During the long, dark, greasy night of our teenage years, however, ardor curdles into loathing. At the time, such noir takes on the spandex set were novel; today, they have become the glum, monotonous, gore-flecked norm.

0 thoughts on “Superheroes!: Capes, Cowls, and the Creation of Comic Book Culture by Laurence Maslon

Leave a Reply